The Need for Focus

A new study published in JAMA Network Open by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that development of the teen brain is associated with individual crash risk. In particular, the researchers found that slower development of working memory, which is crucial to safe driving, was associated with higher crash risk.

Elizabeth Walshe, PhD, Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Flashing your headlights can cause you and the other driver to loose focus.
Drivers once commonly flashed their headlights at oncoming cars that had their high beams on. We've gotten away from that. Here's why. . .

Christopher Mele, New York Times

July 2019: Who is smarter? You or your car? Care to bet your life on your answer?

"Very smart people" are killed by their new car.
Ms. Penney, 81, and Mr. Livingston, 88, were found dead at their home in Sarasota, Fla., poisoned by carbon monoxide, according to preliminary tests by the local medical examiner. Susan Livingston said that after the car — which had a keyless ignition — pulled into the garage attached to their house, the engine had continued to run.

David Jeans, New York Times

Turn on your signal and turn on your brain.
When you turn on your turn signal, you’re turning on your brain.  The act of clicking the blinkers declares your intentions to yourself. It’s the start of a checklist to look left, look right, signal, look left, look right. That level of mindfulness can reduce the possibility of an unintentional gaffe that may have serious consequences.

Norman Mayersohn, New York Times

July 2019: The verdict on Self Driving cars: Not anytime soon.

Despite High Hopes, Self-Driving Cars Are ‘Way in the Future’
Ford and other companies say the industry overestimated the arrival of autonomous vehicles, which still struggle to anticipate what other drivers and pedestrians will do.

Neal E. Boudette, New York Times